Embargo Watch

Keeping an eye on how scientific information embargoes affect news coverage

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Embargo on study of how to retain women engineering students lifted early after break

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The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) lifted the embargo early Friday on a paper, after a news outlet broke it three days before it was scheduled to lift.

From an email sent to the journal’s media list Friday: Read the rest of this entry »

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Written by Ivan Oransky

May 21, 2017 at 7:48 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Minnesota Public Radio News breaks embargo on study of fresh water lake salinization

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The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) lifted the embargo early Monday on a study of fresh water lakes, after a news outlet broke the embargo.

From an email that out to reporters Monday about four hours before the scheduled 3 p.m. Eastern embargo: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

April 13, 2017 at 3:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

You say tomato, I say embargo: A study ripens too early, as magazine breaks an embargo

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tomato

Via CC BY-SA 3.0 license (click for original)

Here’s one story that needed more time to ripen.

An email from the Science press team sent about 40 minutes before the 2 p.m. scheduled embargo lift of this week’s issue: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

January 26, 2017 at 1:41 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Following heavy criticism, FDA says controversial embargo policy is “not to be used under any circumstance”

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Several months after a damning expose demonstrating that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was violating its own official policy by using a controversial embargo practice, the agency has said it will no longer use so-called “close-hold embargoes.”

Such embargo agreements restrict whom reporters can talk to before embargoes lift, unlike standard embargoes in which journalists can share information for comment as long as their sources understand it is under embargo. I’ve called this an attempt to turn reporters into stenographers.

In a letter today to the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ), outgoing FDA Acting Assistant Commissioner for Media Affairs Jason Young acknowledges that at times, the agency’s policy “was not adequately followed.” And Young — whose last day at the FDA is today, ahead of the Presidential inauguration — writes (bolding his) that  Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

January 19, 2017 at 4:12 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Daily Mail breaks embargo on gonorrhea-killing mouthwash study in BMJ journal

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daily-mailSexually Transmitted Infections, a journal published by the BMJ, has lifted the embargo early on a study of Listerine and gonorrhea after the Daily Mail ran a story 24 hours before the scheduled embargo.

From an email sent to The BMJ’s press list this morning: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

December 20, 2016 at 10:42 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Scrap embargoes? Careful what you wish for, says longtime PR pro

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Brian Reid

Brian Reid

On Tuesday, Vox posted what I called my “embargo manifesto.” I’ve been pleased to see it generate substantial discussion, including disagreement and criticism, on social media. And I’m also pleased to present this guest post from Brian Reid, a former reporter for Bloomberg who’s now a director at PR/communications firm W2O, responding to the piece.

Reading Ivan Oransky’s well-thought out missive against the use of embargoes in scientific and medical communication reminded me of the Winston Churchill chestnut about democracy: It’s the worst form of government, except for all of the others. The embargo system, in which vetted reporters receive additional time to assess and report complex information, in return for agreeing not to publish before a certain time, is also the worst system, except for all of the others.

In Oransky’s view, the current system encourages hype, discourages context and empowers journals and corporations to the detriment of reporters and, particularly, their audiences. Much of that criticism is spot-on.

But what would the world of medical reporting look like if embargoes went away? Certainly different, but probably not better. Here’s what you’d get every Wednesday at 5 p.m. (when the New England Journal of Medicine goes public): Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

December 1, 2016 at 8:30 am

Posted in Uncategorized

The revolution will not be embargoed: My embargo manifesto, on Vox

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vox-logoI’ve finally done it: My embargo manifesto is live.

Today, Vox — thanks to Eliza Barclay and Julia Belluz — published “Why science news embargoes are bad for the public.” In its 2,000-plus words, I try to distill my thinking on embargoes, the Ingelfinger Rule, and the system that’s evolved around media coverage of science.

The title perhaps gives away the main thrust; here, in the parlance of journalism, is the nut graf: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

November 29, 2016 at 10:20 am

Posted in Uncategorized