Embargo Watch

Keeping an eye on how scientific information embargoes affect news coverage

Remember, folks: It’s weird embargo time season

leave a comment »

It’s like clockwork.

I wrote about “weird embargo time season” a decade ago, and here I am writing about it again.

Twice per year — once in March and once in November — parts of the world set their clocks either forward or backward on a different day than other parts of the world.

That means that for a total of four weeks per year, the standard embargo time for a journal may seem to be an hour different.

Science and its publisher, AAAS, no doubt know this, but even those of us who obsess think about embargoes a great deal can forget. Witness this message that went out from EurekAlert! yesterday: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

March 10, 2020 at 6:30 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Max Planck Institute press release breaks embargo on PNAS paper

leave a comment »

mpg

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) lifted the embargo early on Friday on a paper because the corresponding author’s institute posted a press release days before the embargo was scheduled to lift.

According to an announcement from PNAS, in the paper, “Two systems for thinking about others’ thoughts in the developing brain,” “Charlotte Grosse Wiesmann and colleagues used MRI to examine cortical surface area and thickness in 38 three-year-old and four-year-old children.” Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

March 9, 2020 at 5:30 am

Posted in pnas

UK Press Association breaks embargo on tiny study of potential endometriosis drug

with one comment

pa mediaThe Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) has lifted the embargo early on a study of a potential drug for endometriosis, after the UK Press Association ran the story early.

PNAS tells Embargo Watch:

A wire story from the UK Press Association was published ahead of the scheduled embargo. We are investigating the circumstances. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

December 2, 2019 at 2:59 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Reuters banned from cardiology meeting after embargo break

leave a comment »

accThe American College of Cardiology (ACC) has revoked press access for Reuters reporters to its next annual meeting, following an embargo break that the wire service said was inadvertent.

Last week, Embargo Watch reported that Reuters broke the embargo on two studies being presented at the ACC meeting last month in New Orleans but would not face sanctions from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), which had published the papers. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

April 1, 2019 at 9:46 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Reuters won’t face NEJM sanctions for cardiology meeting embargo break

leave a comment »

 

nejmReuters, which broke the embargo on two studies being presented at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting two weekends ago in New Orleans, will not face sanctions from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), which had published the papers.

Apparently, Reuters contacted NEJM about the break when it happened. According to a note from NEJM’s manager of media relations and communications: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

March 25, 2019 at 8:00 am

Posted in nejm embargoes

The math prize embargo that didn’t add up

with one comment

fields

The Fields Medal

What a mess.

Last Wednesday, at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Rio, the International Mathematical Union announced the winners of the Fields Medal, which many consider the Nobel Prize of math. The announcements had been embargoed until 11:30 a.m. Rio time, which is 10:30 U.S. East Coast time.

But as David Castelvecchi, who covers math, physics, and other subjects for Nature, tells Embargo Watch: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 7, 2018 at 8:30 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Did an advocacy group just take a step toward a dreaded “close hold embargo?”

leave a comment »

public citizen hrgOn Monday, an email from a reporter landed in my inbox with a subject line that began: “FOR EMBARGO WATCH.” My immediate reaction was one of guilt; as readers know, I have not been able to find a fraction of the time I’d like to write here. But then I opened the email, and saw a curious thing.

Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, which is more than a little media savvy, was sending a letter to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Office of Human Research Protections (OHRP), criticizing how studies of ketamine had been conducted. Nothing all that unusual there; it’s the kind of thing the Health Research Group does regularly.

This is what struck my correspondent as unusual: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

July 25, 2018 at 7:21 am

Posted in Uncategorized